‘Pravaah - A Journey’ offered a fascinating exploration of water through four unique arts forms

‘Pravaah – A Journey,’ an initiative by Art Tree, was recently on display at the Open Palm Court, India Habitat Centre. The exhibition explored water through four unique art forms

‘Pravaah - A Journey’ offered a fascinating exploration of water through four unique arts forms
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Murtaza Ali Khan

Pravaah – A Journey,’ an initiative by Art Tree, was recently on display at the Open Palm Court, India Habitat Centre. The exhibition explored water through four unique art forms viz. Madhubani Painting, Pattachitra, Phad and Warli, driven by the endeavor to preserve and promote the legacy of traditional Indian art and crafts.

The noted artists whose works were on display included Manisha Jha and Manoj Choudhary in Madhubani, Purna Chandra Moharana and Tanmay Mahapatra in Pattachitra, Anil Wangad and Sarita Vanjara in Warli, and Prakash Joshi in Phad.

Indian folk art has been handed down from one generation to the next without altering its cultural and traditional vibrancy. Each region is known for its own unique form of folk art and has its distinctive style. The Indian folk arts are simple, yet vibrant, and colourful and they reflect the rich heritage of the land.

Some of the most talked about Indian folk traditions have had cultural and religious influences on their way to modern times, and continue to generate immense curiosity and interest among the connoisseurs of the world of art. The various art forms on display too have enjoyed tremendous patronage both in India as well as abroad. The exhibition gave folk art enthusiasts the chance to experience more of the rich practices that have stood the test of time and form our splendid heritage.

‘Pravaah - A Journey’ offered a fascinating exploration of water through four unique arts forms
‘Pravaah - A Journey’ offered a fascinating exploration of water through four unique arts forms

The depiction of water is present in almost every art form. Water is considered the universal symbol for change, for it is forever flowing, and can take any course. “Water is the most precious natural resource and supports all human, plant and animal life. Manifesting itself in various forms, water from the seas and rivers remains a recurring theme in Indian mythological art and culture.’ Pravaah – A Journey’ is an endeavor to bring forth the various attributes of water that the eclectic mix of artists has brought out in their works. We are very happy to have found a motley mix of artists belonging to different art forms who offer us extensive and varied creations from their oeuvre,” explained Pragati Agarwal, Founder- Art Tree.

Initially the idea was to go with five art forms for ‘Pravaah – A Journey,’ but in the end Art Tree had to settle with just four. “At first we had planned five. Other than Madhubani Painting, Pattachitra, Phad and Warli, we also had Sanjhi on the list. But, unfortunately, the Sanjhi artist got sick with COVID. And so under the circumstances we had no other option but to go ahead with four art forms for the exhibition,” revealed Agarwal. Next, she wants to explore other elements. “We endeavor to cover all the five elements. Through ‘Pravaah,’ we have covered water. Next could be fire or earth. We are still debating,” said Agarwal.

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