Over 50% global population yearly affected by headache disorder: Study

Headaches are one of the most prevalent and disabling conditions worldwide seen mainly among adults between 20 and 65

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IANS

More than 52 per cent of the global population are affected by a headache disorder every year, with 14 per cent reporting migraines, according to study.

Headaches are one of the most prevalent and disabling conditions worldwide seen mainly among adults between 20 and 65.

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology reviewed 357 publications from between 1961 and the end of 2020 to estimate the global prevalence of headaches.

The review, published in The Journal of Headache and Pain, showed about 26 per cent people reported a tension-type headache and 4.6 per cent reported a headache for 15 or more days per month.

Further, the studies also indicated that about 15.8 per cent of the world's population have a headache on any given day, and almost half of those individuals report a migraine (7 per cent).

"We found that the prevalence of headache disorders remains high worldwide and the burden of different types may impact many. We should endeavour to reduce this burden through prevention and better treatment," said lead author Lars Jacob Stovner.

Headaches were more common in females than males, most markedly for migraines (17 per cent in females compared to 8.6 per cent in males) and headaches for 15 or more days per month (6 per cent in females compared to 2.9 per cent in males).


The team suggested that further investigation into middle and low-income countries would help present a more accurate global estimate.

"Overall, headache disorders are highly prevalent worldwide and can be a high burden. It may also be of interest in future to analyse the different causes of headaches that varied across groups to target prevention and treatment more effectively," Stovner said.

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