Silent corner at home is a stress-buster: Dr Payal Kanodia

About 82 per cent Indians are stressed out today and nearly 90 per cent people suffer from anxiety. 55 per cent of the employed are also fighting stress and anxiety

Representative Image (Photo Courtesy: IANS)
Representative Image (Photo Courtesy: IANS)
user

IANS

Astonishingly, about 82 per cent Indians are stressed out today and nearly 90 per cent people suffer from anxiety. Fifty-five per cent of the employed are also fighting stress and anxiety. Work-life balance has become a synonym for stress buster. While 41 per cent employees planned for time-off, only 30 per cent could take time off, and the reason is not always work-pressure rather a self-created stress. The rising stress levels even made India earn the title of being the most depressed country in the world, for few years.

"Stress needs to be managed. Interestingly, one in three professionals manage stress by self-control, meditation and yoga, taking morning or evening walks, pursuing their favourite hobby like singing or playing instruments or dancing, or scheduling their lifestyle in a systematic manner. I also found that some people cook and become a home chef every Sunday and some go out for dinner to a nice restaurant. I have come across many people who release stress by organizing their wardrobes," says Dr. Payal Kanodia, Trustee - M3M Foundation, a philanthropic arm of M3M India, India's leading real-estate developer.

Most of the people search for a quiet place where they can unwind and introspect themselves and also for logical conclusion of unfinished agenda. This unfinished agenda has also been a leading factor that only increases palpitation, stress and anxiety.

"This is very true. It is important to have a and quiet and silent corner in your home to unwind. This ‘silent corner' at your home is a stress-buster. I too have my silent space in my house where I sit for about 20-30 minutes quietly every day. It is my space where I am me-within-myself. The daily hectic schedules, meetings and commitments can keep anyone mentally as well as physically occupied, and unless one unwinds, it becomes difficult to cope-up with the next day‘s hectic schedules," says Kanodia.

A report cited top three stressors by employed professionals - ‘balancing work with personal needs' (34 per cent), ‘not making enough money' (32 per cent), and ‘slow career advancement' (25 per cent). There is no surprise, reaching on time to the office has been one of the biggest stress and anxiety initiator. The organisations that have relaxed working hours have seen substantial rise in productivity. Everyone has its own method and proficiency in handling stress and anxiety. Yet, not all are successful.

(Dr Payal Kanodia has been conferred the Grand Doctor of Philosophy from International University of Fundamental Studies, St. Petersburg Russia, and is a Diplomatic member of CDI. She is a listed member with Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain, English Heritage – UK, and Royal Society of St. George - England.)

Follow us: Facebook, Twitter, Google News

Join our official telegram channel (@nationalherald) and stay updated with the latest headlines