Global warming: US report on climate change says India at the 4th spot in 11 highly vulnerable nations

US intelligence agencies have categorised India and 10 other nations as being "highly vulnerable" to climate change, which could lead to more frequent droughts, heatwaves, water, and power scarcity

user

NH Web Desk

US intelligence agencies have categorised India and 10 other nations as being "highly vulnerable" to climate change, which could lead to more frequent droughts, heatwaves, water, and power scarcity.

These 11 countries are in South and East Asia like India, Myanmar, Pakistan, Afghanistan and North Korea.

Apart from this, the report has also identified Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua, Honduras, Iraq, and Colombia as "countries of concern" in terms of their ability to prepare for and respond to environmental and societal crises caused by climate change.

The report stated India and China will play a critical role in determining the trajectory of global warming.

At present, China and India are the first and fourth-largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the world.

Prepared by US intelligence, the report also predicted that global warming will increase geopolitical tensions and risks to the United States' national security up to 2040.

The report has been released ahead of the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) in Glasgow which stated,

''These countries are likely to face warming temperatures, more extreme weather, and disruption to ocean patterns that will threaten their energy, food, water, and health security. India could see frequent and intense cyclones that will contaminate water sources and increase vector-borne diseases. Incidences of dengue will rise in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras and Iraq. There will be a huge loss of biodiversity in these 11 countries, leading to the extinction of plants and animals.

Poor governance, weak infrastructure and endemic corruption will prevent these countries, including India, from adapting to changes caused by climate crisis.''

The report threw light on India and China playing a critical role in determining the trajectory of temperature rise and stated,

“Both China and India are incorporating more renewable and low-carbon energy sources, but several factors will limit their displacement of coal. They need to modernise their grids, have sunk costs that make it relatively cheaper to use coal compared with other energy sources, want to minimise reliance on fuel imports for national security reasons and are trying to appease domestic constituencies who rely on the coal industry for jobs”.

While highlighting water disputes as a key geopolitical flashpoint in India and South Asia the report stated,

''Transboundary tensions may increase over the shared surface and groundwater basins as climate change trigger water insecurity.''

At present, Pakistan depends on downstream surface water from glacier-fed rivers in India for irrigation in the neighboring country.

Click here to join our official telegram channel (@nationalherald) and stay updated with the latest headlines